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McDonnell Douglas DC-10 30F

Specifications & Limitations

Length 180.8 ft
Wingspan 165.4 ft
Range 3,890 mi
Passenger Capacity 0
Freight Capacity 175,000 lbs
Cruise Speed M .84 @ FL350
Ceiling 43,000 ft (est.)
MLW 405,000 lbs
ZFW 267,000 lbs
TOW
572,000 lbs
Notes:

A new category of airplane was added to the world's air transportation system when the DC-10 entered scheduled airline service. It has been demonstrating its value to airlines and air travelers since then, winning world recognition for its reliability, comfort and efficiency in more than 25 million hours of revenue flight.

In addition to the luxury and spaciousness inherent in its wide cabin, the three-engine DC-10 incorporated improvements in propulsion, aerodynamics, structure, avionics, flight control systems and environmental compatibility that advanced industry standards.

The multi-range DC-10 was designed and built in Long Beach, California, by Douglas Aircraft Company, now the Long Beach Division of Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Production was started in January 1968 and first deliveries were in 1971. In a production run extending to 1989, 386 commercial DC-10s were delivered, plus 60 KC-10 tanker/cargo models built for the U.S. Air Force.

The DC-10 Series 30F, an all-freighter model, was ordered by Federal Express in May 1984. First delivery was made Jan. 24, 1986. This pure freighter version will carry palletized payloads of up to 175,000 pounds (79,380 kg) more than 3,800 miles (6,115 km).

The DC-10's General Electric and Pratt & Whitney power plants represented significant advances in engine performance and technology over earlier jet engines. The high-bypass-ratio turbofans yield lower specific fuel consumption, lower noise levels, smokeless exhaust, easier maintenance and design for high reliability. Thrust ratings range from 40,000 to 54,000 pounds (17,144 to 24,494 kg). Two engines are mounted beneath the wings; the third is above the aft fuselage at the base of the vertical stabilizer.

The roomy flight deck of the DC-10 has stations for a three-member crew, plus seating for two observers. Prime considerations in cockpit design were simplicity, efficiency and low crew workload. Large windshields provide exceptional visibility, particularly during approaches, landings and ground maneuvering. The DC-10 is certified for automatic landing under Category IIIA weather conditions, allowing operation in near-zero visibility.

The airplane was designed specifically to be a "good airport neighbor," operating from existing runways, taxiways and loading areas. Although each engine produces more than twice as much takeoff thrust as the most powerful engines on first-generation jetliners, the DC-10 power plants are significantly quieter. The DC-10 was the first commercial transport to be certified under the stringent FAA Stage 3 regulations governing sound levels for new aircraft, and it also complies with international noise standards.

Courtesy Boeing

 

Author Stewart Global Aircraft
Painter

Altair Weavers & Painters Guild

Date Added

April 17, 2004

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